South Carolina

Surrogacy Law in South Carolina

South Carolina Surrogacy Law: Types of Surrogacy

In South Carolina, gestational surrogacy is permitted because no statutes or case law prohibit it. There is case law on the books declaring it valid by way of acknowledging the validity of surrogacy agreements: Mid-South Ins. Co. v. Doe.  Consequently, South Carolina is an intent based parenting state.  Under In re Baby Doe, 291 S.C. 389, 392 (1987) that court determined that evidence of a parent’s intent to create life and hold a child out as their own, despite a lack of genetics, will result in legal parentage rights.

Traditional (genetic) surrogacy is also legal in South Carolina, but is treated more like adoption and, therefore, may be illegal—unless payments are reasonable pursuant to the adoption statute S.C. Code Sec. 63-9-310(F)(1).

The legal process to secure parental rights can vary across the state—it could be different in Columbia from how it is in Charleston, different in Myrtle Beach from how it is in Greenville. We strongly recommend retaining legal counsel, knowledgeable of reproductive law in the state. This is of particular importance if you’re pursuing surrogacy as an international candidate- that is, if you’re from outside of the United States and working with a surrogate in South Carolina.

Are There Surrogate Requirements in South Carolina?

No specific legal requirements exist to serve as a gestational surrogate in the state of South Carolina.

Does South Carolina Surrogacy Law Allow for Pre-Birth Orders?

Parentage Orders: Courts in South Carolina do grant pre-birth orders along with post birth orders, but the process to obtain orders varies across counties among judges.

The conditions under which intended parents could be declared legal parents with a pre-birth order if at least one parent is genetically related to the child are listed below:

Yes

Married heterosexual couples, using their own egg and own sperm
Unmarried heterosexual couples, using their own egg and own sperm
Married heterosexual couples, using a sperm or egg donor
Unmarried heterosexual couples, using an egg or sperm donor
Single parents using an egg or sperm donor
Married same sex couples, using an egg or sperm donor

No

For intended parents who are in no way related to the resulting child due to use of donor embryos, no pre-birth order will be issued, and the parties must complete a post birth adoption of the child.

Yes

No

Whose names go on the birth certificate in South Carolina?

Parents will be listed on the birth certificate as “mother” and “father.”

While a married same sex couple can obtain a birth certificate with both parents listed, an international same-sex male couple can obtain a birth certificate listing the biological father and gestational surrogate as parents, if needed to complete legal requirements in the native country.

Surrogacy Conditions for Same-Sex Couples in South Carolina

Are There Options for Unmarried Intended Parents in the state of South Carolina?

Egg Donation Law

South Carolina has no case law or statutes to govern a donor’s rights to children resulting from a surrogacy agreement.

State law information verified by the following (ART) Assisted Reproductive Law attorney licensed in South Carolina*

* This information is for general informational purposes only and is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. We strongly recommend retaining legal counsel, knowledgeable of reproductive law in the state.